BCRC Client Spotlight: Jacquie Roberts diagnosed with Stage IV Breast Cancer, metastasizing to the liver and bones

How did your family react to your diagnosis and treatment?

Most of my family is deceased. I have a loving aunt and cousin who were very upset about the diagnosis. I have given them every bit of information available to me. While they are very concerned, the initial shock is over. Being informed about the disease, understanding treatment procedures and options have helped them accept the situation more easily. We know at Stage IV the prognosis is dire, but having as much information about the situation eases the stress that inevitably comes.

How did you learn about BCRC?  

When I was first diagnosed, I researched the Web for any reasonable information available to me.  l found organizations nationwide. l contacted several. Soon, l realized an organization in another state, staffed with volunteers who had not had cancer and some who knew only of what they read would not be appropriate for me. l needed someone with that…been there, done that kind of information. While referrals were helpful, the rubber hit the road when l came across the Breast Cancer Resource Center. I was told that the staff was of women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives. That’s when I relaxed a bit and accepted their help. I listened more intently, because to my mind, there is no help like help from someone who can relate to what you are going through, who knows some of what is in store for you and what may help you get through this shocking new thing.

Has the BCRC been of help to you? If so, in what ways?

I made an instant connection with the woman who spoke with me. l was asked if I wanted to talk to someone who was in a Stage IV support group. Oh, yes I did. I was asked if I wanted what they called a Patient Navigator; someone who had had cancer to walk with me through this new and scary thing called Cancer. Oh boy, did I. Eventually, my understanding grew. Gradually, I found questions to ask and answers were there. In the beginning, I didn’t know enough to know what to ask. I listened. I spoke. I found questions and answers. I found out that there is a thing called living with cancer. They shined a light into the terrible darkness and held my hand while I walked through the valley of the shadow of death. I am not alone. Their presence is a God send to me.

Are you involved with a support group?

The BCRC got a member of the IV League to call me. She told me its membership is comprised of women who have been diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer, like me. Some of these women have been in treatment for years in Stage IV. This was a stunning revelation to me. I met women who are walking down this road miles ahead of me. Who knows what will happen, but one thing is for sure when I have a question about medications, side effects, Doctors, symptoms, diet, alternative approaches, or what have you, I get tons of information from my IVLeaguers, volunteering their experiences to help me. Cancer brought me the best people I’ve ever known into my life. I’ve known some terrific people, but the BCRC brought me the miracle of life back into my life.

Do you feel a sense of community with the BCRC and your support group?

The BCRC is the embodiment of community, a community of people who would have never met one another if it were not for Cancer. It is a constant wonder to me that in the face of the most dire of circumstances that we find our humor, we find life, giving our best efforts to one another. Cheering each other on. I would say the BCRC brought me into a family of loving, caring, knowledgeable and experienced friends openly giving of themselves to a purpose bigger than anyone of us. We are fighters, knowing that Cancer isn’t the only monster among us, slapping fear and ignorance in the face.

Would you be willing to provide a quote regarding the BCRC and/or your support group?

The BCRC stands out among the masses of support organizations. They have the kind of firsthand information you need to know from the point of view that reflects your concerns. The concept of family doesn’t even begin to describe the intimate trust and connection one experiences through the BCRC. The world of hope, love, information and experience of people who have or have had what you have will open up to you. Please call. You will be much happier you did.

Most of my family is deceased. I have a loving aunt and cousin who were very upset about the diagnosis. I have given them every bit of information available to me. While they are very concerned, the initial shock is over. Being informed about the disease, understanding treatment procedures and options have helped them accept the situation more easily. We know at Stage IV the prognosis is dire, but having as much information about the situation eases the stress that inevitably comes.

How did you learn about BCRC?  

When I was first diagnosed, I researched the Web for any reasonable information available to me.  l found organizations nationwide. l contacted several. Soon, l realized an organization in another state, staffed with volunteers who had not had cancer and some who knew only of what they read would not be appropriate for me. l needed someone with that…been there, done that kind of information. While referrals were helpful, the rubber hit the road when l came across the Breast Cancer Resource Center. I was told that the staff was of women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives. That’s when I relaxed a bit and accepted their help. I listened more intently, because to my mind, there is no help like help from someone who can relate to what you are going through, who knows some of what is in store for you and what may help you get through this shocking new thing.

Has the BCRC been of help to you? If so, in what ways?

I made an instant connection with the woman who spoke with me. l was asked if I wanted to talk to someone who was in a Stage IV support group. Oh, yes I did. I was asked if I wanted what they called a Patient Navigator; someone who had had cancer to walk with me through this new and scary thing called Cancer. Oh boy, did I. Eventually, my understanding grew. Gradually, I found questions to ask and answers were there. In the beginning, I didn’t know enough to know what to ask. I listened. I spoke. I found questions and answers. I found out that there is a thing called living with cancer. They shined a light into the terrible darkness and held my hand while I walked through the valley of the shadow of death. I am not alone. Their presence is a God send to me.

Are you involved with a support group?

The BCRC got a member of the IV League to call me. She told me its membership is comprised of women who have been diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer, like me. Some of these women have been in treatment for years in Stage IV. This was a stunning revelation to me. I met women who are walking down this road miles ahead of me. Who knows what will happen, but one thing is for sure when I have a question about medications, side effects, Doctors, symptoms, diet, alternative approaches, or what have you, I get tons of information from my IVLeaguers, volunteering their experiences to help me. Cancer brought me the best people I’ve ever known into my life. I’ve known some terrific people, but the BCRC brought me the miracle of life back into my life.

Do you feel a sense of community with the BCRC and your support group?

The BCRC is the embodiment of community, a community of people who would have never met one another if it were not for Cancer. It is a constant wonder to me that in the face of the most dire of circumstances that we find our humor, we find life, giving our best efforts to one another. Cheering each other on. I would say the BCRC brought me into a family of loving, caring, knowledgeable and experienced friends openly giving of themselves to a purpose bigger than anyone of us. We are fighters, knowing that Cancer isn’t the only monster among us, slapping fear and ignorance in the face.

Would you be willing to provide a quote regarding the BCRC and/or your support group?

The BCRC stands out among the masses of support organizations. They have the kind of firsthand information you need to know from the point of view that reflects your concerns. The concept of family doesn’t even begin to describe the intimate trust and connection one experiences through the BCRC. The world of hope, love, information and experience of people who have or have had what you have will open up to you. Please call. You will be much happier you did.

Tagged under:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.